National Grasslands Visitor Center | Black Hills & Badlands - South Dakota

National Grasslands Visitor Center

  • National Grasslands Visitor Center
    National Grasslands Visitor Center
  • National Grasslands Visitor Center
    National Grasslands Visitor Center
  • National Grasslands Visitor Center
    National Grasslands Visitor Center
  • National Grasslands Visitor Center
    National Grasslands Visitor Center
Find Us: 
708 Main St.
Wall, SD 57790
Call: 
(605) 279-2125

The National Grasslands Visitor Center is the place to come and seek education and information on America’s Forest Service Grasslands system.  Offerings include an award-winning 20-minute film and museum.  Park Rangers give daily interpretive programs and provide key information about recreation opportunities.  Admission is FREE.  Family friendly.  Open year-round.

Of all the groups of plants on earth, grasses are the most important to people. This fact, along with the unusual history of the Forest Service’s twenty National Grasslands, makes the National Grasslands Visitor Center one of a kind.

Wall, South Dakota, is home to the National Grasslands Visitor Center. The Center is part of the Buffalo Gap National Grassland - Wall Ranger District. Two blocks from the Center on Main Street is the world famous Wall Drug.

A theater, exhibit room, Jr. Ranger program, restrooms and a sales area are offered. For passport stamp seekers, check out the prairie dog featured on the Buffalo Gap National Grassland stamp. Exhibits feature grassland wildlife, grazing management and the history of the Great Plains. Other exhibits created by the Center staff are made to be touched!

You will never be late for the start of the theater presentation. The 25 minute “America’s Grasslands” presentation is shown upon your request.

Range is one of the five renewable resources of multiple-use management. The Forest Service is required to manage for a variety of uses such as recreation, range, timber, wildlife and fish habitat, and watershed. The twenty national grasslands are part of the 191 million acre responsibility of the Forest Service.

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